iA Securities & HollisWealth* are now iA Private Wealth

We are excited to introduce our new company name, iA Private Wealth. The new name is designed to better reflect the essence of what our advisors do – provide holistic wealth management solutions tailored to the unique needs and goals of investors across Canada.

Please take a few moments to browse our newly redesigned and updated website to learn about the many benefits of working with an iA Private Wealth Investment Advisor.

*Refers solely to the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada licensed advisors within HollisWealth.

Your Wealth, Our Passion

Building, growing and preserving wealth takes planning and a comprehensive, holistic vision. When you work with an iA Private Wealth Investment Advisor, you have a trusted partner who is fully dedicated to your success at every stage of your lifelong financial journey.

Holistic planning for every facet of your life

We believe comprehensive personal wealth planning, supported by unbiased advice, collaboration and transparency, is the key to meeting your needs and helping you achieve your goals. Our advisors focus on six main priorities to create a plan that’s tailored to you:

Investing

A proven wealth management philosophy is one that takes emotion out of the equation and relies on a disciplined, long-term approach. Your objectives, risk tolerance, return expectations and time horizon will be the key factors your Investment Advisor takes into account in designing a plan that can help meet your retirement and other goals.

Saving & borrowing

Your Investment Advisor will help you set and achieve saving goals aligned with your needs and objectives, and develop a borrowing and debt management strategy for your unique circumstances.

Education planning

Whether you’re looking to fund a child’s education or returning to school to upgrade your credentials, your Investment Advisor can help you understand your options and maximize the value of a Registered Education Savings Plan (RESP).

Tax planning

Your Investment Advisor will conduct a thorough assessment of your circumstances to determine the most tax-efficient way of building your portfolio.

Risk management

Your Investment Advisor will develop a risk management plan that addresses the full range of factors that could affect your financial well‑being.

Will & estate planning

To plan for the preservation and transfer of your assets, your Investment Advisor can help you keep an eye on the horizon by understanding your situation and wishes, including tax-efficient legacy planning.

Latest insights

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Do you need a prenuptial agreement?

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By iA Private Wealth, April 16, 2021

If you’re getting married, it’s an exciting time. You’ve got many things to do before the big day – is a prenuptial agreement one of them? It’s usually not top of mind for couples entering marriage, but it’s worth considering.

A prenuptial agreement (also called a prenup or marriage agreement) is a written, legally binding document that a couple signs before they marry. In the event of divorce, a prenup determines the rights of entitlement (e.g., how assets are divided).

People often hesitate to sign a prenup. They feel it assumes the relationship is headed for divorce or treats marriage as a business arrangement. That’s not necessarily the case.

Think of it as a form of insurance. When you buy home insurance, you’re not assuming your house will burn down. When you buy disability insurance, you’re not assuming you’ll suffer a major accident. You just want peace of mind knowing that you’re protected if something bad happens.

Benefits of a prenup

A prenup encourages open communication before marriage regarding important life issues. You will disclose financial circumstances (good and bad), major goals, approach to childrearing, etc. You’ll learn what’s important to your partner and what needs and concerns he or she may have.

Here are eight more reasons to sign a marriage agreement:

  1. You want to protect your existing assets (e.g., a home, investments, insurance policies, jewelry or other possessions with monetary/sentimental value) and future inheritances.
  2. There’s a significant imbalance in the value of assets each person brings to the marriage.
  3. You own or have an ownership stake in a business (especially a family business).
  4. One partner (or both) is carrying a large amount of debt into the relationship.
  5. You want to uphold an existing estate plan so your assets are distributed according to your wishes when you die.
  6. One partner (or both) is already divorced and/or has children who may be receiving financial support.
  7. A prenup can make divorce less contentious, facilitate a smoother settlement (which may mean lower legal fees) and ensure a fair distribution of assets.
  8. Divorce is a common cause of financial hardship and bankruptcy, potentially jeopardizing long-term financial health and stability.

In Canada, the laws regarding prenuptial agreements vary by province, so be aware of the parameters and limitations that apply to your province of residence.

Postnuptial (postnup) and cohabitation agreements

Like a prenup, a postnup is legally binding and stipulates how a couple’s assets are distributed in the event of divorce. But as its name suggests, a postnup is signed after getting married. Courts often treat a postnup carefully to ensure validity of the reasons why the couple made this arrangement after they exchanged vows.

Cohabitation agreements differ slightly. Without a prenup, a divorcing couple typically splits their assets equitably. This default action doesn’t apply to common-law couples with no cohabitation agreement. For example, you’re not automatically entitled to 50% of the shared home, even if you’ve been making 50% of the mortgage payments and covering 50% of home maintenance costs.

Keep all receipts and other documentation regarding home-related expenses, and ensure your name appears on the title of the home. Alternatively, a cohabitation agreement can clearly (and legally) spell out how you deal with financial issues when together, and what happens to your assets should the relationship end.

If you’re engaged or thinking about moving in with your partner, an iA Private Wealth Investment Advisor can work with your legal counsel to create a marriage agreement that is fair and protects your assets.

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Maximizing the Benefit of Philanthropic Giving

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By John Tabet, November 10, 2020

This is the second article in a two-part series on charitable giving. Read Part I here.

For high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth families, leaving a lasting legacy through philanthropy is very often a central priority that spans multiple generations.

Many of my own clients – and their millennial children – exhibit a very strong desire to use their wealth to support a wide range of worthy causes, from racial justice to anti-poverty to environmental sustainability.

They are often surprised to learn, however, that setting up a foundation and making cash donations is typically not the best approach to supporting their cherished causes. For most wealthy individuals and families, making in-kind donations of shares via a donor-advised fund is the most attractive option for philanthropic giving.

Why not a foundation?

Setting up and maintaining a charitable foundation is, from an administrative perspective, very much like creating and maintaining a business.

The legal and accounting work that goes into establishing a foundation will typically cost in the neighbourhood of $10,000. And while foundations do not pay tax, they are still required to file an annual return. That means yearly accounting expenses, which come on top of the ongoing administrative work of managing assets held within the foundation.

If foundations were the only option for carrying out a philanthropic plan, they would be well worth the effort and expense. But there’s a better way.

Donor-advised funds

A donor-advised fund is a third-party vehicle – offered by most community foundations and some asset management firms – that effectively outsources the functions that would normally be performed by a foundation, while achieving all of the same charitable goals.

Donor-advised funds offer tremendous flexibility and convenience, as they allow you to make a large donation in a given year, claim the donation tax credit for that year, but disburse the funds in later years to a variety of charities. With a donor-advised fund, you simply make the gift and provide instructions on how to disburse it, and the organization that runs the fund takes care of the rest.

The fee associated with this service is generally low – typically 1.0% to 1.5% for a $250,000 donor-advised fund. In some instances, the fee is based on the number of donation grants you request. In both cases, the fee is not tax deductible, but it does not reduce the amount your donation tax credit is based on.

In short, with a donor-advised fund, you’ll save time and money, and you’ll be able to focus your philanthropic efforts on the joy of giving, rather than on administration and accounting.

In-kind stock donations

One of the best ways to maximize the amount you give – and the tax benefit of giving – is to make in-kind donations of stock, rather than cash donations generated from realized gains. To illustrate, let’s look at a hypothetical example.

Geneviève is a 32 year old attorney living in Montreal. Five years ago, she used $500,000 in family funds gifted to her to purchase shares of Facebook.

The shares are now worth $1 million, but Geneviève just received a $5 million bequest on the passing of her grandmother. So she decides to use the full value of her Facebook shares to make a generous donation, via a donor-advised fund, to the children’s ward of her local hospital, and a local organization that supports women victimized by domestic abuse.

Here are her options:

Sell and donate the proceeds

The sale of the shares would generate $1 million in cash, and 50% of the $500,000 capital gain – $250,000 – would be subject to a tax rate equivalent to Geneviève’s highest marginal rate, which is about 50%.

This would result in a tax bill of about $125,000, leaving $875,000 to donate to her charities of choice. Her tax credit would then be calculated based on the donation amount of $875,000.

Donate the shares in-kind

Gifting the shares means Geneviève would not be subject to capital gains tax, as our tax code says that when you donate shares to charity in-kind, you don’t have to claim a capital gain.

This means the charity would receive a donation valued at $1 million rather than $875,000, and Geneviève would get a donation tax credit calculated on $1 million rather than $875,000.

Conclusion

With the right planning, you can maximize the benefit received by your charities of choice, and increase the tax benefits of your generosity. Working closely with an experienced and knowledgeable Investment Advisor ensures that each component of your philanthropic vision is planned and executed as efficiently as possible, aligning all aspects of your intergenerational wealth plan – investment management, philanthropy and estate planning – with the values that define who you are.

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Lower Your Tax Bill Through Charitable Giving

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By John Tabet, November 10, 2020

This is the first article in a two-part series on charitable giving. Read Part II here.

Over the last number of years, my interactions with clients have shown a clear and undeniable trend: today’s investor is moving away from the conventional separation of wealth creation and personal values, and more towards the complete integration of socially conscious priorities into the holistic wealth planning process.

On the investment side, this often takes the form of increased interest in socially responsible investment funds, which in recent years have gone from a market niche to a core offering for virtually all asset management firms.

But the most direct way of expressing a commitment to a cherished cause, apart from the gift of your time, is through monetary donations. In this article series, I’ll provide an overview of how you can incorporate charitable giving into an optimally structured wealth plan, and explain how to maximize the benefit of your monetary gifts – both for your charity of choice and yourself.

Different types of donations

There are three main ways to make monetary donations:

  1. Giving
    Simple, one-off acts of support, such as buying a raffle ticket at a charity golf tournament or supporting a church bake sale.
  2. Being charitable
    Personal engagement with a specific organization that aligns with your values, and making monthly or annual financial gifts to support it.
  3. Philanthropy
    The option of choice for high-net-worth and ultra-high-net-worth individuals and families. Typically, this involves looking out over a longer time horizon and entails a systematic approach to donating very large sums to one or more causes.

In this article we’ll focus on being charitable; in the next installment of the series we’ll take a closer look at philanthropy.

Being charitable

For most people in the wealth accumulation stage of their financial journey, charitable giving will involve annual donation amounts ranging from hundreds to thousands of dollars, spread out over multiple charities or focused on a single cause.

When you donate to a registered charity you become eligible for tax credits, making charitable giving a win-win for both you and your charity of choice. Let’s look at an example:


  • Andrea makes $100,000 a year as an app developer in Toronto.
  • She donates $1,000 in 2019 to a registered charity focused on environmental sustainability.
  • Current tax rules allow for a federal credit amounting to 15% on the first $200 of the donation and 29% on the remaining $800, for a total of $262.
  • On the provincial level, Andrea can claim 5.05% on the first $200 and 11.16% on the remaining $800, for a total of $99.38.
  • The combined federal and provincial tax credit on her $1,000 donation reduces her income tax bill by $361.38.

This example represents a fairly straightforward case, but our tax rules include a number of other provisions that can enhance your credit amount and add significant flexibility to how you claim your credits. These include:

  • An enhanced credit rate of 33% on eligible amounts over $200 for taxpayers who earn more than $200,000 annually.
  • The ability to carry forward donation credits to any of the five years subsequent to the year the donation was made.
  • The ability to transfer donation credits to your spouse or common-law partner and combine them on a single tax return.

Conclusion

Charitable giving is one of the best ways to meaningfully support causes that engage and inspire our natural impulse to help those less fortunate than we are and join with those dedicated to making our world a better place. Working with your Investment Advisor and accountant can make this immensely satisfying activity financially beneficial for you as well.

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A career at iA Private Wealth

Looking for a rewarding career in financial services? We have a wide range of opportunities for talented, committed professionals, and offer attractive compensation and benefits.

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Investment Advisor opportunities

More and more advisors are looking to iA Private Wealth as the partner of choice for building and growing an independently owned and operated business with an unwavering focus on client success.

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